Category Archives: Photography

“Have You Even Seen…”

Rough-leaved Aster (Eurybia radula), originally uploaded by eracose.

Each season brings its gift of wildflowers and plants. The fall is especially beautiful. In addition to the changing colours of the leaves, a completely new crop of wildflowers comes into bloom including fireweed, asters, butter-and-eggs, and many others.
Fall is also the time for beautiful red dogberries which can be seen all over town. In local weather lore, a large number of dogberries predict a bad winter. Wild birds eat the dogberries, and residents make dogberry jam, jelly and wine in the fall.

Backroad September
BackRoad Dogberries

Wayne Chaulk of “Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers” described best all that nature offers us. The Gosse Family, performing during the Bay Roberts 60th Anniversary Summer in 2011, remind us of all that our natural environment offers, as well as the incredible musical talent that originates in Newfoundland and Labrador.
“Have you ever seen …” performed by The Gosse Family – Lewis, Michele and Sonya.


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Filed under Bay Roberts, Newfoundland and Labrador, Photography

The Holdin’ Ground Festival and Klondyke Days – 2010

The Holdin’ Ground Festival and Klondyke Days in Bay Roberts are over for another year. With so many things still happening in the town and in the region, it seems more like a beginning than an ending.

Some of the highlights of this year’s events included starting the festival with the launch of the “Holdin’ Ground Project” ( and “The Pigeon Inlet Quilt.” (Pigeon Inlet Quilt Showing ). The two theatre productions: “ A Time in Pigeon Inlet” and ” Salt-water Moon” were very successful and well attended. The Klondyke Days Opening Parade was held on a perfect day with an enthusiastic turn out. (Photos on Flickr)  Supersports Weekend went very well. Fans enjoyed the tribute concert to Neil Diamond at the Canadian Legion. Shopping Days at the Klondyke with the Dragon Boat Race and the Avalon North Wolverines Search and Rescue Display were enjoyed by everyone. (Photos on Flickr)  The first “Haunting” was held on Coley’s Point with a much larger than expected turn out.  (Photos on Flickr)  The new Klondyke Storyboard was unveiled (Photos on Flickr )  and the Cable Building was officially recognized as a National Historic Site. (Photos on Flickr)

Even though it poured rain during the closing fireworks, there was a tremendous turn out and many said it was the best fireworks they had ever seen!
Fireworks in the Rain.Fireworks in the Rain!

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Filed under Bay Roberts, Flickr, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northern Avalon, Photography, Provincial Historic Commemorations Program

Bay Roberts East Shoreline Heritage Walk

Perhaps, one of the most underrated tourist attractions in Newfoundland and Labrador is the Bay Roberts East Shoreline Heritage Walk  [AKA Madrock Trail]. Many people who drive along the Conception Bay Highway, passing through Bay Roberts, are unaware of Bay Roberts East, the part of the town which is located on the tip of the Bay Roberts peninsula. The 4 km. walk is through some of the most spectacular scenery in the province, and many of the features built by early settlers, such as root cellars, rock walls, and even an old cemetery have been preserved.

The silence is striking. The only sounds are the cries of birds and the crunch of your foot steps. If you are a member of FaceBook or Flickr, you will see that each person who visits the Shoreline Walk comes home with amazing photos, that reflect what has impressed that particular individual.

Some of the well- known parts of the trail are French’s Cove (the site of early settlement), Juggle’s Cove,  and Fergus Island, which face towards Port de Grave and Bell Island,  Madrock – from which you can see Bell Island (on one side) and Upper Island Cove (on the other), and the Three Sisters, which faces towards Spaniard’s Bay, Bishop’s Cove and Upper Island Cove.

French’s Cove is the site of early settlement.
French's Cove - Bay Roberts Shoreline Heritage Walk

The set of photos of French’s Cove was taken in the fall, and had an atmosphere that reminded me of fairy stories that I had heard.  On the Flickr set, a number of fairy stories are include with the photos.

Fergus Island is named after a prominent merchant in the community.  From a certain angle, the island looks like a resting Newfoundland dog with its paws stretched in front of its face.
Fergus Island

Madrock –

Madrock offers spectacular views of the ocean, especially when the winds are high. In this photo, Upper Island Cove can be seen in the background. From other angles, Bell Island can be clearly seen.

In front of Madrocks, Upper Island Cove in far background.

The Three Sisters – A Pebble Beach
Mussel Boil on the Beach

During the summer of 2010, the Bay Roberts Cultural Foundation is hosting another Mussel boil on the Beach on Sunday, July 11th.

Families from town also come to the beach during the caplin scull.  The caplin roll on the beaches, and families scoop them up to eat fresh or to salt and dry to eat year round.

Caplin Have Arrived

While you are in the Northern Avalon this summer, be sure to visit the Shoreline Heritage Trail. You can call the Bay Roberts office and ask for a guided tour. However, I think just following your own path, communing with nature and enjoying the scenery is an adventure.

Map of the Shoreline Heritage Walk  >  >

Neal O’Leary’s “Have You Ever Fell in Love” accompanies views of the Bay Roberts East Shoreline Heritage Walk.

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Filed under Baccalieu Trail, Bay Roberts, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northern Avalon, Photography, Tourism

Understanding Content – Introduction

Text messaging, email, Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, and other social media have made high level literacy more important than ever in all our lives. We could choose what, when, and whether to read in a book, magazine or newspaper or look at TV or a video; now we are bombarded with text and images through internet devices.

When a person lives in Newfoundland and Labrador, analysis of content and graphics written about the province becomes a consuming interest because of the amount of misinformation that has been published in various formats about the province. Newfoundland has a small population and is in a relatively remote area; as a result, it is not well known. When reports in various formats are given about the province, its life style, and its people, I immediately check for factual accuracy, weighted words, and visual cues. Over the past few years, the quality of reporting has improved, because people have become more familiar with the province due to advances in communication technology; however, incorrect information and misinformation takes a long time to overcome.

The level of misinformation about this province has offered a tremendous advantage for judging the veracity of information presented on all topics and all places. Because I am so used to examining information written about our province, I have picked up the habit of looking at other material in a similar way. Weighted words, misleading visuals, and sweeping generalizations jump off the screen (or the page.) The extent to which people are willing to believe anything that is published, in print or electronically, never ceases to amaze me.

Today, while much of the information received through social media is from acquaintances, business associates, and friends that we have chosen to follow, advertisers and propagandists are surging [the term is used deliberately] into Facebook, Twitter, and other social media. Are we prepared for this onslaught?

In the past, product advertising was much less targeted. It was assigned to certain print publications or TV programming based on less clearly defined data such as age group or perceived socio-economic group. In social media, advertising can be much more targeted based on very specific demographics and interests.

Propaganda is much more dangerous. Lurking in your Facebook, in your email attachments, and/or your Tweets can be people who are deliberately spreading propaganda, usually filled with misinformation, weighted words, and selected visuals which convey hatred and/or contempt for selected races, groups of people, or ideas.

Over the next few weeks, I will be presenting a series on this topic. Meanwhile, see my Twitter list “News and Commentary” The list [which is of necessity slanted towards Newfoundland and Canada] contains members with different and often opposing points of view. Though examining all, hopefully “truth” will become evident. If you would like to have your Tweets added to the list, please Tweet or email.


Filed under Literacy, Newfoundland and Labrador, Photography, Social Media, Twitter

Twitter Mashup

Twitter is a mashup – combining past and present – history and technology – cultures and places – and most importantly – people.

Kindred Spirits about Role of the Internet

Through Twitter, I have been able to do many things from finding tips about web design and graphics to pursuing political, environmental and social issues to posting links about our clients and about this area so that people all over the word can see them.  However, perhaps the most interesting Twitter  experience was a personal one. Tweeting led me to Peg Mullligan, a lady in New England, who is also interested in blogging, in distance learning, and practical uses of the Internet.  Because of our mutual admiration of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables, we realized that we were kindred spirits in the way we envisioned the role of the Internet.

Squanto - Courtesy of the Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth

Squanto - Courtesy of the Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth

Squanto (Squantum)’s Link to Cupers Cove (Cupids)

Serendipitously, my son travelled to Plymouth, Massachusetts earlier this fall, through Cupids 400, to research and photograph a little known fact in the history of John Guy’s Cupers Cove Colony.  Squanto (aka Squantum), a Native American, who had been born and grew up in Patuxet (which stood where Plymouth now stands), lived in Cupers Cove (Cupids) in 1617 -1618.  He went back to his homeland in 1619, and was there to greet the Pilgrim Fathers when they arrived in 1620.

Though his knowledge of English, he was of great assistance to them. William Bradford, Governor of the Plymouth said of him:

…Squanto continued with them and was their interpreter and was a special instrument sent of God for their good beyond their expectation. He directed them how to set their corn, where to take fish, and to procure other commodities, and was also their pilot to bring them to unknown places for their profit, and never left them till he died.

Squanto (Squantum) is little known as a person. He is usually portrayed as a Disneyesque caricature with the Pilgrim Fathers at Thanksgiving.  Yet, his life story is one of the most compelling in history.  He endured unimaginable hardships and personal suffering, and he was of great assistance to the Pilgram Fathers, helping them to survive in the New World.  I completed Internet research about him earlier and have included it in a website.

Squantum Website

Just as a little side comment, the caption on the bust of Squanto in the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, explains that Squanto’s head is the only remaining piece from a grouping of  figures representing the Pilgrim Fathers’ arrival in the New World that stood at the entrance to the Museum in the early 1900s.  That seemed so appropriate!  Squanto is still the ultimate survivor.

Statue of a Wampanoag overlooking Plymouth Harbour

Statue of a Wampanoag overlooking Plymouth Harbour

Twitter Connection

While in Plymouth, my son met Peg and her family who spent the Columbus Day Holiday in the area.  Then Peg invited my son to write a guest blog for her blog series: .

Technical and Marketing Communication: Content for a Convergent World: “Live with Abundance ”

As I said, though Twitter and our mutual interest in history, we have been able to combine history, culture, and learning in an interesting way.  I hope others will join in our experience through commenting on the topic of Squanto and early New World settlement, which is of great interest to us in this area due to the 400th Anniversary of Cupids, the first English Colony in Canada, in 2010 [References about Cupids 400 –  Cupids 400 Website The Cupids Archaeological Dig, Crossroads for Cultures – an Educational Site about Cupids 400 ], but also on the value of the Internet and Twitter as a cultural and a learning experience.


Filed under Cupids 400, Photography, Social Media, Twitter

The Rock… from Many Perspectives: Newfoundland Photography.

Living in Newfoundland and Labrador inspires photography.  The spectacular setting of the capital of St. John’s, as well as the unique local housing, such as Jellybean Row, and Quidi Vidi Village, are frequently photographed.

In “Outports,”  located on the shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean,  the ever changing moods of wind, light, and water are a photographer’s delight.  Because the province is very sparsely populated, nature is on the doorstep… many varieties of birds and other wildlife are frequently seen;  wildflowers, trees, and other plant life is always on display.  And of course, rocks and rocky seascapes are everywhere.

Our own photos of Bay Roberts and nearby communities on the Northern Avalon can be found on Flickr:

Because of the quality and variety of  Newfoundland Amateur Photographers who display their works on Flickr and blogs, we have been using these for time as a source for regional photos for both print and websites.  After finding a suitable photo, we contact the person who has posted it and ask for permission to use the photo, assuring him or her that we will credit the work in any publication.    Almost without exception, they have given permission.

Below is a listing of some sites we check very frequently for the quality of their photos:

Karen Chappell  Location: St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada
Karren Chappell - Family views Iceberg

Karren Chappell - Family views Iceberg

Lloyd C. Rees: Location: Chamberlains, CBS (On the other side of Conception Bay from Bay Roberts) – photos of seascapes, birds, wildflowers, historic photos.

Lloyd Rees - Sailing near Bell Island

Lloyd Rees - Sailing near Bell Island

Clyde Barrett: Location: Bishop’s Cove, Conception Bay North (On the other side of Spaniards’ Bay Harbour.) photos of birds, seascapes, icebergs, wildflowers, boats.

Clyde Barrett - Young Bald Eagle

Clyde Barrett - Young Bald Eagle

Geoff Whiteway : Location: St. John’s.  He teaches at the Marine Institute, which is affiliated with Memorial University, in St. John’s.  His photos have a unique look and feel.

Iceberg Off Shore by Geoff Whiteway

Iceberg Off Shore by Geoff Whiteway

Jean Knowles : Location:  St. John’s.  She is a Tour Guide in Newfoundland and Labrador. Her photos are of scenery, wildlife and flowers.

Jean Knowles - Iceberg from Signal Hill

Jean Knowles - Iceberg from Signal Hill

Mark Robertson Tsang: Location: West Coast Newfoundland. He is a ski instructor/coach in the winter months and is also a tour guide.  His photos of wildlife and plants are amazing – he even uses the correct biological terms.

Mark Robertson Tsang - Great Northern Peninsula

Mark Robertson Tsang - Great Northern Peninsula

I will be presenting another list in the near future.  There are just too many to include in one posting.

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Filed under Admiral's Coast, Baccalieu Trail, Bay Roberts, Brigus, Carbonear, Killick Coast, Labrador, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northern Avalon, Photography, Tourism, Western Newfoundland